THERMAL SCIENCE

International Scientific Journal

CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF METHANOL IN THE CENOSPHERIC FLUIDIZED BED

ABSTRACT
The process of oxidation of gaseous CH3OH by N2O was carried out over an Ag-Fe2O3-cenosphere catalyst whose structure can be defined as double shell-core catalyst. Preparation of the catalyst was carried out in two stages: thermal decomposition of Fe(CO)5 at above 160°C and then electroless Ag plating. The process of methanol degradation by N2O was carried out in a fluidized bed reactor. The study confirms that it is possible to achieve complete degradation of N2O and CH3OH for the obtained catalyst at above 450°C when the contact time of the reactants with the catalyst is approximately 6 second and when the substrates are used in stoichiometric ratios. More than 60% of the hydrogen contained in CH3OH can be converted to molecular hydrogen at 500°C with a ratio of N2O/CH3OH not greater than 0.6 and with a contact time of reactants with the catalyst of approx. 6 seconds.
KEYWORDS
PAPER SUBMITTED: 1970-01-01
PAPER REVISED: 2019-02-28
PAPER ACCEPTED: 2019-03-03
PUBLISHED ONLINE: 2019-09-22
DOI REFERENCE: https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI19S4231B
CITATION EXPORT: view in browser or download as text file
THERMAL SCIENCE YEAR 2019, VOLUME 23, ISSUE Supplement 4, PAGES [S1231 - S1240]
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© 2019 Society of Thermal Engineers of Serbia. Published by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International licence