THERMAL SCIENCE

International Scientific Journal

Authors of this Paper

External Links

THE EFFICIENCY OF A DYNAMICALLY INSULATED WALL IN THE PRESENCE OF AIR LEAKAGES

ABSTRACT
The movement of air in and through the building envelope often plays a leading role in the transport of heat and moisture into the building. It is caused by pressure and temperature variations around the building envelope inbuilt ventilation system, occupancy, etc. In order to improve the energy consumption, alternative designs for the ventilation systems are considered. One of them is a dynamically insulated wall as an inlet unit for the supplying air. In order to predict the performance of a dynamically insulated wall, it is necessary to make an analysis of the building as a system. This paper presents such system analysis which takes into account the interaction between the building components and indoor and outdoor climate, both in terms of the air leakage and heat and mass transfer to and from the building components. It is shown that, in the presence of air leakages (unintentional openings) in the enclosure of the building, the efficiency of the dynamic insulation is significantly decreased.
KEYWORDS
PAPER SUBMITTED: 2004-02-02
PAPER REVISED: 2004-02-16
PAPER ACCEPTED: 2004-02-24
DOI REFERENCE: https://doi.org/10.2298/TSCI0401083K
CITATION EXPORT: view in browser or download as text file
THERMAL SCIENCE YEAR 2004, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 1, PAGES [83 - 94]
REFERENCES
  1. CEN/TC 89 WI 29.3: Hygrothermal performance of building components and building elements. Assessment of moisture transfer by numerical simulations. To be published.
  2. Elmroth, A., Fredlund, B. The Optima-house. Air quality and energy use in a single family house with counter flow attic insulation and warm crawl space foundation. Lund: Lund Institute of Technology. 1996.
  3. Hagentoft, C-E.. HAMSTAD (Heat, Air and Moisture Standardization) WP2 Modelling, Version 4. Report R-02:9. Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology. 2002.
  4. Hagentoft, C-E. Final report: Methodology of HAM-Modelling. Report R-02:8. Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology. 2002.
  5. Rode, C., Gudum C., Weitzmann, P., Peuhkuri, R., Nielsen, T. R., Sasic Kalagasidis, A., Hagentoft C-E. International Building Physics Toolbox, General report, R-02:4. Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Building Physics. 2002. Also available on www.ibpt.org.
  6. Samuelson, I. Moisture balance in the cold attics. The importance of Ventilation and Choice of Insulation Materials. In Swedish. SP rapport 1995:68. Bor峬 Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. 1995.
  7. Sanders C. IAE Annex 24, Final Report, Volume 2, Environmental conditions. K.U.Leuven, Belgium: Laboratorium Bouwfysica, Departement Burgerlijke Bouwkunde. 1996.
  8. Sasic Kalagasidis, A. HAM-Tools, International Building Physics Toolbox, Block documentation, R-02:6. Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Building Physics. 2002.
  9. Sasic Kalagasidis, A. The whole model validation for HAM-Tools. Case study: hygro-thermal conditions in the cold attic under different ventilation regimes and different insulating materials. Report R:03-6. Department of Building Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. 2003. Also available for free downloading on www.ibpt.org.
  10. The MathWorks Inc.: Matlab, Simulink. www.mathworks.com
  11. Weitzmann, P. A floor heating module using an S-function approach for the International Building Physics Toolbox. Lyngby: Technical University of Denmark, Department of Building Physics. To be published. 2002. Also available on www.ibpt.org

© 2020 Society of Thermal Engineers of Serbia. Published by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International licence